ACCTS

 

 

This Journal is sponsored by the Assn. for Christian Conferences, Teaching and Service.

ISSN: 2354-8315 (Online)

 

Story and Community--Vital Keys for a Christian Approach to Military Ethics in the 21st Century - The Importance of Story and Community--The Military Community
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Article Index
Story and Community--Vital Keys for a Christian Approach to Military Ethics in the 21st Century
Symptoms of Moral Deterioration in Situations of Conflict
Root Causes Relating to the Fragmentation of Moral Authority
The Importance of Story and Community--The Christian Community
The Importance of Story and Community--The Military Community
Indwelling a 'Story'
Conclusion
All Pages

The Importance of Story and Community--The Military Community

When a soldier joins the army and begins to serve with his or her regiment or Corps he is not only becoming part of a community but is initiated into a history. He becomes part of a story. During his years and months of service he is shaped by that story and the story impacts on his values and character. It is within such a story-shaped community that values and loyalties are formed. The core values for the British Army are courage, loyalty, discipline, selfless service, integrity and respect for others.

Stanley Hauerwas states, "The moral life is not simply a matter of decision governed by publicly defensible principles and rules; we can only act in the world we see, a seeing partially determined by the kind of beings we have become through the stories we have learned and embodied in our life plan."

Similarly, Charlotte Linde writes: "Part of becoming a member of any institution, formal or informal, is learning to tell the stories of that institution, and learning to tell one's own stories in a way coherent with those of that group. Part of what one needs to know to be a member is what the stories of the group are, what events in the past are judged to have relevance to the present, what values the stories exemplify, and when it is appropriate to tell them. This is one very important way that people actually take on the values of the institution as their own. It is this participatory process which makes stories particularly effective as a way of transmitting social knowledge, because the hearer comes to participate in the construction of the story, and thus comes to have a stake in it."



Last Updated on Wednesday, 24 March 2010 10:38